Architecture

London Town Fun

On May 10, 2006 I kept an appointment. An appearance in London at 8 A.M. on the live Earthcam situated at Covent Garden. That was 4 P.M. London Time. The middle left photo below shows the webcam view (Ken Garrett downloaded my actual appearance, but it vanished in my e-mail files.) The middle right image is my snapshot of the same location. Then below you see the webcam itself, to the right of the upright support.
Covent Garden, with its markets, cafes, and street performers is a favorite hangout in London.

The piazza shown in the top photo dates from 1632. The reference on one building is to the Punch and Judy shows observed and documented here by Samuel Pepys in 1662.

Covent Garden was originally, in fact, a Convent Garden of the Westminster Abbey monks.

Vegetable fields and fruit trees flourished here from 1536. I missed any explanation of why the “n” was dropped to make Covent Garden the name. Being as neither garden or convent remain any way.

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London’s Eye, The Millennium Wheel, is currently the world’s tallest observation structure of its kind. It soars to 443 feet on the South Bank of River Thames.

The stark facade of the Tate Modern Museum. The Spartan feel is from a design that was originally the Bankside Power Station. The some 20,000 sq ft of interior space became a selling point for converting to a museum, beginning with its funding in 1996.

The enterance and foyer of the Tate Modern.


The Cambridge Pub, Cappuccetto’s, and SoupWorks at Leicester Square, above. Also, Bar Soho.

A view of rooftops and chimneys as seen from an above leg of the Underground.

Views from The Underground.

London is a sea of suits. Men dress for work. And if any respectable English Gentleman should forget, he is reminded to adjust his dress before leaving the WC.

Architecture

Faces

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Aksel is a law student in Göteborg but he works in Marstrand during the summer tourist season.

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Young Arvid stops to smile while scooting about Marstrand on his razor scooter.

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Emrik is removing candle wax at the enterance to Restaurang Högvakten, one of the many historic eateries in Marstrand.

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Lady in Red, London

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Naked Lunch, Copenhagen. Christiania, Copenhagen’s commune like enclave founded by hippies, performance artists and misc. social misfits has been under attack for several years by conservative politicians. These are young residents of that community staging a provocative protest against the latest points of conflict between themselves, law makers and law enforcement. Police quietly stood by to make sure there were no problems between the friendly protesters and the gawking on lookers. Attitudes about such public nudity are vastly different in Scandinavia and Europe than in the U.S.

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A young resident of Christiania

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This lad’s special talent in walking around naked, but on his hands. Do I dare post a picture of that?

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This is Copenhagen’s Black Diamond, a modern building on the waterfront housing The Danish Royal Library. Mondays are rough for young construction workers needing to make up for lost sleep during the weekend.
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Love in Copenhagen

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Love in Amsterdam.  Twilight at 11:00 P.M.

Architecture

Reflection

Sunrise in Scandinavia comes early in the day during summer. This is of benefit when photo shooting. Having views of scenery before clutter of pedestrian, bicycle and auto traffic. A low sun catches color on buildings. And if breezeless, mirror like reflections shine in the vast reaches of Copenhagen’s waterways.

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DanTravelman

Eat’m 12/2/06


The EAT’m Diner blog for 12/02/06: Birria in Guadalajara, French Dip Sandwich, Los Angeles
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Each region of Mexico boasts its own unique distinct food or dish. A specialty of Guadalajara is Birria, a savory stew typically made with goat, pork, lamb or sheep. The sauce is a blend of spices, chili, and cumin. This stew bakes hours before it is dinner table ready.


The twin specialty of the region is Borrego. This is lamb or sheep slow roasted for hours over glowing hot wood embers.

Birrieria Las Nueve Esquinas near downtown Guadalajara offers Chivo (Goat) Birria and Barbocoa de Borrego as their main menu items. This kitchen-dining room is charmingly decorated with indigenous pottery and earthen ware hanging on bright color walls trimmed in tile. Folk crafts decorate the window.

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When traveling to Los Angeles, a stop at Philippe, The Original French Dip Sandwich Restaurant, is mandatory.
Their legend states “French Dip” was innovated when a French sandwich bun fell into the juices or drippings of roasted meat pan. The customer, impatient for his sandwich, vetoed making the sandwich over again. His discovery was so thrilling the man returned the next day with a legion of his co workers for exactly the same accidental taste treat.

The sandwich is available with roast beef, pork, lamb or turkey. I never know which one I like best. I’ll often sample a couple. Philippe’s mustard is their own, not restaurant supply. I always dab some on my sandwich. And frequently experience a nasal rush. A cold beer works best for me accompanying this meal. But the lemonade is renown. I’m always undecided whether to go with cole slaw or potato salad. Some times if I return to the counter for that second or third sandwich I’ll have both.

Historical

Handyman

For the Christmas season of 1971 San Diego had no Home Depot, Lowe’s, Home Base or Builder’s Emporium. It was Handyman. Notice the price of the drill and jig saw. Now a days you pay that much just for bits and blades.

Architecture

Twisted Tails of Copenhagen


Few spires are this beautiful or unique. Borsen–the old Copenhagen Stock Exchange. Hans Van Steenwinckle was the architect. Rundetaarn, shown in my previous essay, was also designed by him. It is a Dragonspire he created in 1625 for the Stock Exchange Building.

The tails of four dragons are twisted together in symbolic guardianship. This twining is a statement of strength. But the architect achieved a lightness and grace with the open chamber just below his dragons.

Architecture

Death By Inconsolable Shame


The spiral or circular ramp. These have fascinated architects and their clients through centuries.

Rundetaarn (The Round Tower) 1642 of Copenhagen, Denmark has a ramp some 685 feet long spiraling around a hollow core. King Christian IV rode up and down this ramp with a horse and carriage. Home to Europe’s oldest functioning observatory, which sets a top with the viewing platform. A haven for scientists, intellectuals and teachers.

An inscription on the side is a rebus or code. “Lead, God, into the heart of King Christian IV The Right Teaching and Justice, 1642.” The tower is over 114 feet tall with a view of old Copenhagen that is a pleasure to behold.


The spires of old town Copenhagen stand like sentinels. They seem to call and speak to one another.

 

The spires of old town Copenhagen stand like sentinels. They seem to call and speak to one another.

The spires of old town Copenhagen stand like sentinels. They seem to call and speak to one another.

In view from Rundetaarn is another spiral design, The Church Of Our Savior, 1752.

There is a tragic legend of this tower’s architect, Laurids de Thurah. Spirals found in fortress towers turn to the left giving guards a free hand and extended reach advantage for defending right handed swordsmen. Conversely spiral stairs found in churches have a right turn helix.

The legend say when Laurids inspected his completed work a realization fell upon him like a mortifying pall. His spiral sprung the wrong way. His design was flawed.


His shame was so inconsolable he threw himself from the top of what was supposed to be his masterpiece.

The story must of stuck in my mind. Everywhere I turned in Copenhagen that church spire seemed to always catch some part of my peripheral site. The lurking ghost of Laurids. I was compelled time and time again to photograph this tower. Lovely site, sad legend.
But alas, if one happens to come across a book of history’s greatest urban legends, this story is surely amongst them. Architect Laurids de Thurah, in fact, enjoyed opening day as a moment of great pomp and circumstance. King Frederik V walked all the way up this grand spire as 27 canons saluted in the church square.


All the pomp and circumstance was repeated in 1996 upon the church’s restoration. Prince Joachim made the same walk as Frederik. No one then, or before, dove from the tower.

What is true, however, Laurids de Thurah died only seven years after completion of his spire. Reportedly Poor and forgotten. Maybe the legend was created to remember him in a more dramatic and enduring way. Not just to say he died in bed one day.


Thanks to Tom. His rendering of the church tower story to me and his metaphorical descriptions of Copenhagen and its features were of sublime inspiration. Also to Heather for research on the design theory of spiral towers (Right hand vs left helix).

More views from a top Rundetaarn).

 

Nature

Fallen Leaves

The classic San Diego autumn weather pattern occurred this past weekend. Mornings and evenings of dense cloud cover. But afternoons of bright blue sky and warm temperatures. Percipitation in San Diego commonly occurs in the dark of night. One awakens to sunshine with rain washed streets and landscaping. And a fresh smell of the air.

The rain also shook loose some colorful leaves from the tree in my front yard.